The 3d Printers at Work

Its amazing what you can print these days. We tested out the Mendel Prusa last evening by printing this cool little light bulb sculpture.

If you could make any design in your head come to life, what would it be?

Much of what we can do these days with 3D printing is due to the hard work of Brandon.  Be sure and check out the new RepRap piece he’s making to ensure 3D printing just gets better and better: Vertical X-Axis

Be sure to check out our new “Makery Mendel” channel on Ustream, located in the links to the right.  Whenever the Makery is printing, you can see it happening.

The Why of Makerspaces (Hackerspaces)

Ever since I visited Noisebridge in San Fransisco back in November of 2010,  I had burned into my head how amazing it was, and how great it’d be when we finally had a space of our own in Omaha.  What I didn’t see in my brief visit was all the work that someone’s doing behind the scenes. At the Makery, there’s always something to be cleaned up, fixed up or otherwise looked after, and as a Doocracy, those things tend to fall to whoever cares the most (Did I mention, I’m sort of a neat freak?)

Sometimes, I get lost in the maintenance and wonder why we collectively go to the effort of maintaining an actual space, especially after working on robot arms in Dave’s pretty slick basement workshop.  Last night, a few visitors to the Makery reminded me, with phrases like “This place is magic” and “I never thought Omaha could have a  hackerspace”.  That right there sums up what went through my head when I walked in the door at Noisebridge just a year ago.

I’ve said it before (at the Makery’s Founding Day Celebration), but I’ll paraphrase it again here because it bears repeating:  A Makerspace is just a lens that focuses the energy and talents of a creative community.  The people are what makes the Makery great.  Our people collaborate on art projects, build impromptu electric vehicles, entertain out-of-town guests, have Nerf-modding contests, provide material and technical resources for individual projects and are just a generally great group of friends.

One Month to Make: Nerf Gun Distance and Style Mod Competition

Are you a Maker?

The Omaha Maker Group is hosting a Nerf* dart gun competition for distance and visual improvement modification.

When: 7pm, November 9th

Where: The Makery

Competitors will modify a Nerf ‘N-Strike Nite Finder EX-3‘ to maximize it’s distance and/or aesthetic value.  Steampunks, artists, we look to you for inspiration.

The entrance fee for the competition is $10, but anyone can come and watch for free.

The gun may be modified in any way, provided that it remains at least somewhat identifiable as an N-Strike, and does not use pre-compressed air (such as CO2 cartridges) or chemical power. Electric power is permitted, provided the voltages are within reason (meaning the gun won’t cause a power outage).

Ammo will be standard-unmodified Nerf darts. For the contest each contestant will provide with their entry a minimum of three such darts in good condition (a new N-Strike comes with 3 darts), which will be pooled and used for the competition.

The modified weapon in ‘primed to fire’ condition must fit within a 3x7x11 inch container.

Performance for the distance competition will be measured by a maximum range test. The gun may be held by the contestant or mounted in a vice, provided the muzzle does not extend beyond the firing line. Distance will be measured from the firing line.

The cosmetic “Fine Weapon” competition will be judged by majority vote of your fellow participants.  The winner will be judged to have a very fine weapon indeed.   The winner will also gain a 10% distance bonus in that competition.

The winner of the distance competition gets bragging rights and a 1 month free membership to the Omaha Maker Group.

 

 

*’Nerf’ is descriptive of the brand of equipment to be used, and does not imply any other association with the brand.

 

 

 

 

Handlebar Camera Bracket

Tonight, I finally got around to finishing up the Handlebar Camera Mount project.  The mount consists of a hunk of printed PLA, sawed in half, and bolted back together around the handlebars. At the moment, I have a piece of rubber tape wrapped around the bar, under the mount, to keep it from slipping, but my Canon S5 is pretty heavy and it needs a bit more wrapping underneath.

The printed portion of the mount weighs around 60 grams, and took about 90 minutes to print on the Makery Mendel.  On the side facing the camera, you can see where we lost a bit of blue tape.  The part has an inner diameter of an inch, and is about 2″ wide, to provide good stability for the camera.

The hardware is 4 1.5″,1/4-20 stainless steel hex head cap screws. I opted for stainless because “It’s a bike, and it’s going to be outside”… The bolts were around a buck a piece, which wasn’t really any more money than the regular steel ones.  Hex-keyed is sorta like metric: It just costs more, and no one knows why.

All this puts total materials cost (including the PLA for printing) at just under $10.  The model for the printed version is available here.

 

In the Making: Player Guitar

Kevin’s been busy lately. All hail the hypnoguitar!

So far it plays 1 string and can play simple songs. The idea is to make a slide guitar that can play complex music from a program, much like “player” pianos read from sheet music. This is a demo video showing the progress so far.

Its coming together, don’t you think?

Read more on the project at the Player Guitar Wiki

The Mendel is Alive!

We have finally gotten the Makery Mendel to print properly!

So far we have printed a huge camera mount to connect Kevin’s camera and bike. Also, we have made a couple of new gears and linear bearing mounts to upgrade the ‘bot.

However, we are in need of funding for more plastic. The roll of PLA we are using is almost out, and a new spool will be about $65 plus shipping.

Here are some pics of stuff printed so far. :)

Happy Birthday Omaha Maker Group

Tuesday marked the 1 year anniversary of the Omaha Maker Group, known internally as Founding Day. It signifies the first [large] meeting of Makers at Upstream Brewery where the Omaha Maker Group name was chosen.  It wasn’t until later that we were legally organized, but that’s not the point.

In honor of the somewhat momentous occasion, we had a gathering at the Makery including cake and grilling, for around 20 people.  A good time was had by all, and it was a pretty good excuse to clean the place up a bit.

It occurs to me that the most valuable thing that the Omaha Maker Group has given us in the last year isn’t the physical workspace down at the Makery, nor any of the growing collection equipment there, but rather all of the people we’ve met.  We have really great bunch of  Makers, techies, artists and doers of all kinds; People willing to help when you get stuck on a project or to mock you into starting the project in the first place. For my part, I’ve made more than a few friends along the way.  Here’s to many more years of Making in Omaha.

Convert old 35mm film camera lenses to work with digital SLRs

Zach sez:

This week I took a simple camera lens from a $3 film camera I got from a thrift store and attached it to a cheap Canon body cap after drilling a hole in it. The result was a bit surprising once it was attached to the camera. Since the lens gets so close to the sensor, it made an inexpensive macro lens.

Results:

Nice going!

Print heads for the Makery Mendel

Tonight, I was on assignment for Brandon and the Makery Mendel again, this time drilling some really really tiny holes.

These acorn nuts will be used as print heads to extrude the molten plastic on the almost-done Makery Mendel 3D printer. I started the process by holding the piece of allthread (Which has a shallow hole in the end) in the lathe chuck and threading a nut onto the end.  I know that generally a bolt thread isn’t true enough to rely on for machining, but in this case, I want the operations all true to the bolt, as that’s how it’s going to be held in use.

Next, I faced off the rounded end of the nut, being careful not to get too deep (which is what happened on the rightmost unit). I then used a tiny drill bit in the tailstock chuck to ever-so-gently drill the hole.  On the 0.3mm unit, you can see where the drill bit had a slight bend in it, and wanted to drag around the part instead of start drilling in the center.  I was able to change the orientation of the bit in the chuck to correct this.

Finally, I cut a bit of an angle on the side of the nut, making it more conical than round.  Sort of like a cut-off funnel.  Hopefully it works well. One of the nuts turned out to be plated (which, sadly, is one of the sizes I didn’t make a duplicate for)