Tippy forge

Here are a couple of videos of the tippy forge I've been working on for the Omaha maker Group. At this point it just needs the frame to hold it and a handle to make it easy to tip. There is a little leakage from the input that we need to get sealed up, but it works quite well so far.


Motor demonstration rig

One of the interesting projects from the Omaha Maker Group meeting on Jan 10. Ben put together this little motor demonstration rig with a couple of magnets, a 3D printed frame, and the armature from a commercial motor. Here he is just holding a couple of wires against the commutator as brushes. It's interesting to see the effect of adjusting the brush positions relative to the magnets.


OMG’s Patrick Pecoraro to present Contrast, a custom pinhole camera inspired exhibition

From Patrick’s website:

“In order to assemble this series, I faced a specific problem: most pinhole cameras have only one shot. You expose film or paper and have to go back and develop it in the lab before loading the next shot. When there is more than one opportunity for a great photograph, the only option is to carry more than one camera. I came up with a solution. I designed and built a pinhole camera that uses regular 35mm film, but in a larger format. Three rolls are combined, equally spaced, giving a triptych like image. The resulting triptych blends together by persistance of vision. No longer limited to the short distances from the photo lab; I can take this camera hiking and get four to six exposures per set of film. Exposures only limited by the number of canisters on hand and the available light.

This new camera enhances the subject matter. For the last few years I captured images of nature reclaiming the fruits of man, photographing anything from abandoned buildings on the verge of collapse to old tires dumped in a field. Fascinated by the rusting, disintegrating, forgotten objects reclaimed by nature. I believe that capturing these scenes this way helps one understand that, over time, all man-made things will disappear, nature reclaims all.”

You can see Contrast beginning the 13th of January at:

The Tea Smith

1118 Howard St
Omaha, NE 68102
(402) 932 3933

 

Projects Abound!

Despite unseasonably nice weather, the members of OMG continue to work on their projects at the Makery or in their garages at breakneck speed. January is traditionally the perfect month for shunning the outdoors and basking in the glow of your computer monitor or, perhaps, the piercing UV glow of an arc welder.

 

Here’s a quick rundown of what’s in the works among the members of OMG:

Alex has made a LED matrix, for some arcane artsy purpose.

The Makery now has new modular workbenches for your hacking pleasure.

The aluminum forge is online, and continues to be improved.  Excerpt from Dave’s explanation,

“…welded together a frame for the tippy-forge last night. I still need to build the stationary part of the frame and put on a handle. What is pictured here is the moving part of the frame that lifts the forge to pour the metal.

After the welding was done we decided it was time to test the new concrete and the lid that Brandon installed recently. We had a couple of minor issues with the burner. There is some leakage of fuel around the input tube that we temporarily sealed with some duct tape. That lasted just long enough to get the aluminum to melt. The propane bottle was nearly empty and started to freeze up on us at the end, the gas pressure looked to be dropping off. We didn’t have time to get the aluminum up to proper pouring temperature, but it was hot enough to at least dump it out of the crucible. The clearance between the inside of the forge (a large soup can) and the crucible (some iron pipe) is a bit narrow, somewhere around 1cm, but the flame swirls around the body very nicely, and when the lid is on the hot exhaust flows over the pouring spout, which is welded to the crucible, which should help keep it hot so that the metal stays warmer when pouring.”

See something here that interests you?  These projects and more are in the works at OMG.  If you have a project you’d like featured on the site, send a photo and description to info@omahamakergroup.org.  Of course, if you’d like to get involved in a project, or need help with something you’re working on, check out the forum.

Until next time…

Makery Glowstick Fashion

Myself and Brandon Essler put together a glowstick holster and a glowstick bracer at yesterday’s meeting, continuing the trend of glowy maker high fashion.

The plan is to eventually wire these pieces up with some sort of LED infusion.

You’ll be able to view these in action at this year’s “New Year Revolution” event.



Maker High Fashion…the EL Coat

Actually, I’ll leave the judgment as to whether this is fashionable to the reader.  Taking a cue from the ready availability of electroluminescent tape/wire to the Maker community, and yes, the recent Tron movie (which re imagined the cult classic costuming in a decidedly more modern twist), it has become too tempting to ignore the possibilities and shaking up the norm.

And so, using white EL tape from Adafruit, two AAA battery packs, a coat I rather like from H&M, and a bit of sewing, viola!  My Jeff Bridges impression is complete, man.

So, project aside, this has got me thinking about the state of change in fashion in the modern age.  Making a coat like this is one thing…how you use it quite another.  I think the Steampunk community must also face this problem.  When you think a certain fringe fashion is cool, do you wear it only among those who also share your (weird) tastes, or do you let that freak flag fly, hoping to inspire?  Let the social experiment begin!

What is this “Variac” Thing?

A Variac (also known as an Autotransformer) is a variable transformer, which allows the user a convenient way to control the power to an AC appliance.  In our context, it’s typically used to adjust the output of a heating device. The variac currently at the Makery is a 20-amp model manufactured by PowerStat.  We’ve configured it to scale voltage only in the down direction, so that the output range is 0-110vac (or whatever line voltage happens to be).  The transformer is outfitted with standard AC outlet fittings, and is mounted to a board for easy transport.  It should be noted that this transformer is NOT isolated, so the output could still be hazardous, regardless of how low the voltage happens to be set.  As with most other equipment, the variac is stored in the TOOLS cabinet.

Easier Vacuforming with Sintra

One of the other projects enhanced by the Variac is the vacuformer.  It consists of two parts: a box with a heating element that melts plastic (background) and a perforated box which sucks the softened plastic down over a heat-resistant form (foreground).  Prior to the Variac, we’d had problems damaging the plastic sheet, because it was heated too rapidly.  Now, we can adjust the heat very precisely and results are much better.

Note: The reason for the incomplete formations in the black plastic (Sintra) is that both the objects used as forms were heavy, metal and cold; The plastic cooled too rapidly, before a good impression could be achieved.

The vacuforming equipment (both the heater box and vacuum bed) are stored in the “TOOLS” cabinet.  There are several shop vacs to be had, typically stored below one of the benches in the “less clean” area.

Acrylic Bender

The Makery’s recent acquisition of a Variac has rekindled interest in a few projects that had been on hold.  One of those projects was the Acrylic Bender that James had been working on. At it’s core, the bender is just a halogen bulb between two aluminum tubes full of circulating water. The idea is to create a line of focused heat to allow plastics to be bent accurately.  We found that it works equally well for acrylic and Sintra (Foamed PVC).  The Bender (along with the Variac) is currently stored in the “TOOLS” cabinet.

Pizza Potluck and Piezoelectric Presentation – December 13th

At next Tuesday’s meeting (December 13th), we’ll be doing a pizza/potluck dinner. The idea is that everyone throw in a few bucks for pizza and bring whatever else they’d like to share. Food is planned for 6:30, but it’s a pretty casual sort of thing.  If you’re interested, RSVP here.

The presentation for the meeting will be Dave, talking about the piezoelectric effect, and demonstrating how make Rochelle Salt (a piezoelectric material).

The piezoelectric effect is the linkage between an electric charge and the mechanical distortion of a material. It occurs in many materials, from crystals and ceramics to bone and DNA. We use the piezoelectric effect in many ways, but we most commonly encounter it in small speakers, audio pick-ups, and grill starters and lighters. Most commercial piezoelectric materials are engineered compounds that are relatively tough and exhibit a strong piezoelectric behavior, but are difficult to create for oneself. However, one of the earliest piezoelectric materials, Rochelle salt, can easily and safely be made at home, allowing us to explore the piezoelectric effect from the ground up.

Even if you’ve never been down to the Makery, or you’ll be a little late, please come join us!